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Flowering Bulbs

What is a bulb? A bulb is a rounded part of the stem. Like seeds, many flowering plants can be propagated through bulbs. Unlike seeds, we have to wait comparatively more for seeing bulbs developing into beautiful flowers. Bulbs are mostly perennials.  Types of bulbs Winter bulbs: Winter bulbs are hardy bulbs. They require a long cold period to break their resting period (Dormancy) and are planted in fall (September- mid-November). They spend their winter in the soil and blooms in the spring season (February- March). Some of our favourite winter bulbs are Daffodils, Hyacinth, Tulips, Irises, Crocus, and Allium. Spring bulbs: These are tender ones and are planted in the spring (January- February) to obtain vibrant blooms throughout the summer...

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All About Poinsettias - The Christmas Plant

The Poinsettia Plant Story Once upon a time, there was a poor Mexican girl named Pepita, who had nothing to offer to Jesus on Christmas eve, so she picked a handful of weeds from the roadside and made a small bouquet to offer. As she walked near the nativity scene, the weed bouquet turned into the red poinsettia’s flowers, and everyone who was there got amazed and called it a miracle. From that day onwards, bright red poinsettias are known as “Flowers of the Holy Night”. The red flowers bloom during the Christmas season in short days and long nights of winter, mostly during December-January. About the plant Poinsettias are known as Flame-leaf flower and lobster flower. The scientific name...

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Microgreens Part III - FAQs

Are all microgreens healthy? The answer is ‘No’. There are exceptional cases in which microgreens turn out to be poisonous.They contain toxic substances in their stems which can make you ill. Some of the examples are: Tomato, Potato, Brinjal (Eggplant) & Peppers. Are sprouts and microgreens same? No, they are not. First, let’s talk about sprouts. You must have seen white thread-like structures coming out of the gram if you’ve ever soaked them in water to eat for nutritional purposes. These are sprouts. Both sprouts and microgreens are really tasty and full of nutritional packages. In the case of microgreens the seeds are sown in the soil whereas sprouts are soaked in water. Only the portion above the soil is consumed in case of...

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Microgreens Part II - How to grow?

What you need? Plastic tray with small drainage holes at the bottom Seeds  Potting soil Plastic sheets or any type of lid for covering growing tray  Step 1: Soaking  Household seeds such as wheatgrass, coriander, mustard, fennel, fenugreek, ajwain, and green gram can be used. You can also buy seeds of other nutritive microgreens such as alfalfa, pak choi, celery, parsley, kale, amaranthus, pink radish, carrot, spinach cabbage, cauliflower, broccoli, kohlrabi, beetroot, peas, basil, and leek. Soak the seeds in the water for 10-12 hours. After 5 to 7 minutes, observe the seeds that are floating in the water. Discard them. Keep the ones that are settled at the bottom of the container. After 10-12 hours, strain the healthy seeds from...

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Microgreens Part I - What are they and how to use them?

What are they? The stem, cotyledons (or seed leaves), and the first pair of true leaves (real leaves of the plant) are known as “Microgreens”. This concept was first introduced in California restaurants and since then gained its popularity gradually due to their high nutritious content. How to use them? Consumed raw so that there is no loss of micronutrients or as toppings for salads, sandwiches, pizza, bread-butter, soup etc. Why to eat?  They are highly nutritious and qualify as a superfood. In the table given below, we discuss specific benefits associated with some common microgreens. Microgreens Health benefits Broccoli Stimulates the immune system and is a rich source of vitamins, minerals, enzymes, and protein. Red cabbage Rich in vitamins A, B,...

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